James Parkinson

The Promise for Kings and Prophets

David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha “Then spake Solomon … O Jehovah God, turn not away the face of thine anointed: remember thy lovingkindness to David thy servant” (2 Chronicles 6:1, 42 ASV). By Jim Parkinson The lovingkindness, or mercies, shown by God in His covenant with Abraham extends more than a dozen generations to the great kings of Israel, and, also to His servants, the prophets. Consider first David, for whom both his strengths and weaknesses are recorded for all to see. David []

Development of a Chart of the Ages

Divine Plan at a Glance “Write down the vision and make it plain upon the tables, that everyone may read itfluently” (Habakkuk 2:2, Leeser). By James Parkinson The earliest form of a chart of the ages may be in Herald of the Morning 4, 2 (March 1876). The three worlds were shown by three partial ellipses, with three smaller ones within “The world that now is”(“Patriarch,” “Jewish,” “Gospel”), and two more in the “World to come” (“Millennial,” and “ages”). It is seen []

Advanced Doctrines and Viewpoints

Beyond Foundation Principles “If in anything ye are otherwise minded, this also shall God reveal unto you”(Philippians 3:15 ASV). By James Parkinson Doctrines have applications, even those that are not fundamental. The Sin-Offering An “advanced doctrine” would be whether the faithful church has a part in the sin-offering. The two Atonement Day sacrifices are a shadow for the Gospel Age. The bullock was provided by the priesthood, but the Lord’s goat came from the people. The first sacrifice is identified with Jesus []

Laodicean Liabilities

Church Seven “I would thou wert cold or hot” (Revelation 3:15 ASV. Scripture quotations in this article are from ASV and RVIC). by James Parkinson The closing period of the Gospel Age is shown in the letter to the Laodicean period (Revelation 3:14-22). Our Lord gives us few commendations for our period of Christian history. Let us each apply the lessons to self, before trying to apply them to anyone else. Verse 14, “And to the angel1 of the church in Laodicea []

Author and Origin of the Book of Acts

The Book of Acts “If none of those things is true whereof these accuse me, no man can give me up unto them. I appeal unto Caesar” (Acts 25:11 RVIC). by Jim Parkinson Each book of the Bible was written with a purpose. The Gospel of Matthew shows Jesus Christ as the Messiah of prophecy.1 Mark emphasizes Jesus as servant of both God and man. John combats the much later Gnostic (salvation is by knowledge) apostasy.2 Luke writes to a Roman court []