David Rice

The Hope of Glory

Sweet as Honey “Every one that hath forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my name’s sake, shall receive an hundredfold, and shall inherit everlasting life” (Matthew 19:29). by David Rice Jesus’ closing prayer for his disciples included his request that they join Jesus himself in heavenly glory. When Jesus audibly expressed this prayer, the disciples would not have comprehended the grandeur of his request, the remarkable privilege that those words portended []

In The Wilderness

The Gospel Age “Your fathers … proved me, and saw my works forty years” (Hebrews 3:9). by David Rice The forty years Israel wandered in the wilderness represents the Gospel Age wandering of Spiritual Israel as we approach the Kingdom. This period is covered by four books in the Old Testament — Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Exodus records the events of the first year, climaxing with the construction of the Tabernacle on the first day of the year following the Exodus. []

Parable of the Fig Tree

A Primary Sign “Now learn a parable of the fig tree; When his branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaves, ye know that summer is nigh: So likewise ye, when ye shall see all these things, know that it is near, even at the doors” (Matthew 24:32,33). by David Rice The metaphor that Jesus draws for us in these words is about the approach of the Kingdom. When Matthew records that Jesus said “it is near,” Jesus meant that the Kingdom []

With Power and Great Glory

The Final Troubles, Matthew 24:29-31 “Then shall appear the sign of the Son of man in heaven: and then shall all the tribes of the earth mourn, and they shall see the Son of man coming in the clouds of heaven with power and great glory” (Matthew 24:30). by David Rice Listen to audio The text above refers to the closing work of the present harvest of the Gospel Age. Christ has been present since the opening of the harvest in 1874, []

A Distressing Storm

Fourteen Days of Peril Not long after, there arose … a tempestuous wind called Euroclydon … and when the ship was caught, and could not bear up into the wind, we let her drive” (Acts 27:14,15). by David Rice Listen to Audio:  For some years, the history narrated in Acts has engaged our attention as containing pictorial lessons about the progress of the Gospel through the age. For example, the martyrdom of Stephen under Jewish hands, the death of James by Herod, []